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Expectant dads get depressed too



While mother’s "baby blues" have been widely investigated, little research has been conducted on antenatal paternal depression. A team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) shed light on fathers’ mental health by releasing the first study to report the prevalence of depression symptoms among Canadian men during their partner’s pregnancy. This may have important clinical implications for depression screening and early prevention efforts in expectant fathers.

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A breakthrough on how our brain controls body hydration


Scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and Duke University made a discovery that advances our understanding of how the brain detects and prevents dehydration; they have identified the structure of a key protein located in the brain, which is involved in body hydration and that could control temperature. The findings could have important clinical implications: this protein could be a target for the development of treatments and diagnostic tests for many health problems associated with the imbalance of bodily fluids.

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How safe is medical cannabis in the treatment of chronic pain?


A Canadian research team led by Dr. Mark Ware from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) completed a national multicentre study looking at the safety of medical cannabis use among patients suffering from chronic pain. They found that, when carefully monitored, patients with chronic pain who used cannabis daily for one year did not have an increase in serious adverse events compared to pain patients who did not use cannabis. The results will serve as a benchmark study on the side effects of cannabis when used in pain management.

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A glimmer of hope for children with leukodystrophies


An international research team, led by Dr. Geneviève Bernard from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and Dr. Benoit Coulombe from the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), has identified a new gene associated with leukodystrophies, deadly neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in 7,000 children and remain incurable. By discovering mutations on a gene linked to 4H leukodystrophy, one of the common forms of the disease, they can better assess its impact on nervous system cells.

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